QHA

About QHA

Australian Registered Not-for-Profit Charity, founded  in 1981.

The goals of The Queensland Hypertension Association Inc. (QHA) are essentially:
“education and research in the fight against high blood pressure”.

Testimonial:

“There are no words to express my gratitude for all you’ve done. I’m better because you’re the best. Thank you so much”. (PH from Nerang)

 

Education, Research and Support

Under the professional supervision of the Hypertension Units located at Greenslopes Private Hospital and the Princess Alexandra Hospital, the QHA aims to:

  • Inform and educate patients, healthcare personnel and the general public on the causes, diagnosis and treatment of hypertension;

  • Support and encourage research into the causes, diagnosis and treatment of hypertension and into the various means of prevention of hypertension, and

  • Support and encourage other worthy avenues of medical research.

Become a QHA member and join the fight against high blood pressure. 

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The QHA is a health and education charity, registered with the Australian Charities
Not-For-Profit Commission (ACNC) No. 65798207063.


QHA also holds Deductible Gift Recipient status (DGR) with the Australian Tax Office.

Donations or gifts of $2 or more are fully tax deductible 
(in Australia).

Become a QHA member and join the fight against high blood pressure.

#Hypertension = the silent killer

 

QHA's Management Committee

Since 1981, The Queensland Hypertension Association Inc. has been supported and run by a dedicated Management Committee of voluntary hypertensive patients, cured patients, health professionals and other interested contributors. These people believe that patients can help themselves to a significant extent in the prevention and control of hypertension. Please join us.

Want to learn more about the Queensland Hypertension Association Inc.? Get in touch, we’re always happy to hear from anyone interested in joining the fight against high blood pressure.

 

QHA President

Professor Michael Stowasser

Director, Hypertension Units at Greenslopes Private Hospital and the Princess Alexandra Hospital in Brisbane. Michael is also Director of the Endocrine Hypertension Research Centre at the University of Queensland Diamantina Institute. In addition, he is currently President of the High Blood Pressure Research Council of Australia and the Asian-Pacific Society of Hypertension. Michael has over 25 years clinical research experience in pathogenesis and management of hypertension and especially of potentially curable endocrine varieties including primary aldosteronism and renovascular hypertension. Working with mentor Richard Gordon, he helped to demonstrate that primary aldosteronism is at least 10 times more common than previously thought, and is the commonest specifically treatable and potentially curable form of hypertension.

QHA's Founder - Emeritus Professor Richard Gordon

Emeritus Professor Gordon can count QHA as one of the many legacies of his remarkable career, truly earning him the right to be recognised as a pioneer in all facets of hypertension, whether research, clinical practice or public awareness and education.

As we are in the 40th year since the establishment of The Queensland Hypertension Association Inc. (QHA) in 1981, it seems timely to pay tribute to the Association’s founder, Emeritus Professor Richard Gordon. Gordon was a member of the QHA Executive Committee for 16 years from the time of its establishment in 1981, serving as its President from 1984 to 1994 and as Vice Patron from 1994 until the present day.


Gordon’s training as an endocrinologist included research fellowships in Melbourne (Bryan Hudson, The Alfred and Prince Henry’s Hospitals, Monash University), Nashville, Tennessee, USA (Vanderbilt University) under the inspirational Grant Liddle (Liddle’s syndrome, leading authority on the adrenal gland) and the University of Adelaide (Basil Hetzel). In addition to clinical work, these fellowships heavily involved laboratory bench work, setting up, validating and trouble-shooting new assays, which added an invaluable dimension to Gordon’s critical judgement and expertise as a clinical scientist.


Following these fellowships, Gordon returned to Brisbane in 1970 to head the new section of the University of Queensland Department of Medicine at Greenslopes Repatriation Hospital. He established Endocrine Units at Greenslopes and Princess Alexandra Hospitals and a Hypertension Unit at Greenslopes Hospital which developed into an Endocrine Hypertension Research Unit (named a category 1 Research Centre in 1991). He accepted a Personal Chair in Medicine at the University of Queensland in 1982. The Greenslopes Unit achieved a reputation for meticulous diagnostic procedures, attracting referrals from all over Queensland and from other Australian centres.


During 48 years of clinical investigation, Gordon’s scientific contributions have included:

(1) description of the circadian rhythm for renin (the principal blood pressure regulating hormone produced by the kidney);

(2) defining the role of the sympathetic nervous system in the regulation of renin and aldosterone in man;

(3) demonstrating salt-sensitivity of a new syndrome of hypertension and hyperkalemia (Familial Hyperkalemic Hypertension, Pseudohypoaldosteronism Type II or Gordon's Syndrome, named after Gordon by Hugh De Wardener in his textbook on renal disease in 1973), and defining the varying phenotype in invited reviews. Research into the genetic basis of this condition has led to discovery of the role of WNK kinases and ubiquitin genes in the renal regulation of sodium balance;

(4) drawing attention to a variety of aldosterone-producing adenoma responsive to angiotensin (AII-R-APA) which is just as common as the unresponsive variety (AII-U-APA) but previously overlooked, and described in detail the biochemical, physiological and histological differences between these two tumours, predicting a genetic basis for these differences, which has recently been realized by new and exciting genetic discoveries;

(5) describing a new variety of familial primary aldosteronism (familial hyperaldosteronism type II or FH-II), and

(6) as a result of finding and curing primary aldosteronism in resistant hypertensives, showed that primary aldosteronism is much more common than previously thought, and the commonest potentially curable cause of hypertension.


Gordon painstakingly developed strict protocols for the diagnosis and management of primary aldosteronism which are still widely regarded as best practice today. He predicted in 1992 (Lancet) that primary aldosteronism would often have a genetic basis. Gordon’s trainees included Robert Vandongen (Personal Chair in Medicine, University of Western Australia) and Michael Stowasser, Professor of Medicine, University of Queensland and Director, Endocrine Hypertension Research Centre. Michael is also the current President of the QHA. He maintains a collegial relationship with Gordon and frequently comments on his admiration for him and gratitude towards his mentorship.


Gordon has published around 300 scientific papers in peer-reviewed journals, and 24 chapters in texts. He has written an MD thesis (1966) entitled “Circadian rhythms in man. A transverse study of some temporal aspects of adrenocortical and renal function” and a PhD thesis (1981) entitled “Systemic arterial hypertension: adrenocorticotrophin and aldosterone in pathophysiology”.


Gordon was the Gaston Bauer Lecturer for the Cardiac Society of Australian and New Zealand in 2004. He has spoken by invitation at major national and international meetings (for example the US Endocrine Society).


He was made an Officer in the General Division of the Order of Australia (AO) for services to medicine in the field of endocrine causes of hypertension in 1994.


Gordon has been a member of the High Blood Pressure Research Council of Australia, the Endocrine Society of Australia, the (US) Endocrine Society and the International Society of Hypertension.


He has also served on the Council of the Endocrine Society of Australia, the RACP Queensland State Committee, the National Medical and Scientific Advisory Committee of the National Heart Foundation of Australia and the Central Medical Research Advisory Committee of the Australian Government Department of Veterans Affairs.


Gordon set up the QHA as a not-for-profit organisation consisting predominantly of lay people, dedicated towards education and research in the fight against high blood pressure. The main objectives of the QHA were (and still are):

(a) to inform and educate patients, health care personnel, and the general public on the causes, diagnosis, care and treatment of hypertension, and to thereby promote a self-care approach towards control of high blood pressure, and

(b) to support and encourage research into the causes, diagnosis and treatment of hypertension and to provide research in Queensland into the various means of prevention of hypertension.


Through Gordon’s guidance and leadership, these objectives have all been repeatedly met and have benefitted thousands, including hypertensive people, health care professionals, researchers and the general public.


The QHA is the only organisation of its kind in Australia and continues to thrive, regularly holding educational meetings, publishing informative newsletters and providing a much needed source of support for hypertension researchers, and recently launching its own website: www.hypertensionqueensland.com.au. Along with his many contributions to medicine and science, and his establishment of a world class Endocrine Hypertension Research Centre and Hypertension Unit, Gordon can count QHA as one of the many legacies of his remarkable career, truly earning him the right to be recognised as a pioneer in all facets of hypertension, whether research, clinical practice or public awareness and education.

#hypertension = the silent killer

 


PO Box 193, Holland Park, Queensland, 4121, AUSTRALIA

©2020 by The Queensland Hypertension Association Inc. Donations or gifts of $2 or more are fully tax deductible (in Australia)